Blackpaint 256


British Art Show 7 (Hayward) continued – a bit

Olivia Plender – One of those things where a fictional person or story is fabricated and developed; this one is a film director.  Posters, interviews with “colleagues”, autobiographical details, filmography… clever but irritating.

Mick Peters – an architect’s table (cheated, and read the notes), supporting a couple – or maybe just one – of those huge, two man lumberjack saws, painted bright red and rendered “soft”, like Dali’s watches or Oldenberg’s stuff.

Karla Black – A squared-off-at the top pyramid of earth, Aztec rather that Egyptian, with bits and pieces of -coloured plastic (?)  littering the top.  something to do with the brain, I remember.

Drawings/paintings of pseudo-mechanical structures in bright red on off-white paper.  I liked these, but didn’t get name of artist.  If it’s you, please comment and let me know.

Becky Beasley – 6 (I think) enormous photos of the same two interlocking pieces of iron pyrites, taken from different angles.

Matthew Darbyshire – an open-plan room in pinks, with sofas, soft furnishings and lampshades.

Maaike Schoorel – What at first look like plain white paintings, prove to have very faint figures drawn on them with a brush.  Similar – ish idea to the Portuguese artist in the Tate Modern, who erases big tracts of his paintings; I can’t remember his name (rather appropriately, really).

That’s it – for my money, Cullinan Richards, Christian Marclay, Phoebe Unwin and Charles Avery are the most interesting.  I’d have liked to see the naked man on the burning bench, though.

The Man from London, Bela Tarr

Tarkovsky’s Solaris was once memorably described as “stately paced” in a Time Out review (maybe it was City Limits, come to think of it).  This description also fits Tarr’s film, based on a Simenon story.  Black and white, harbour, ferry, night time, rain, steam, trains, gantry, signal box, silent, brooding men, suitcases, fag smoke, spirits, glimmering lights, darkness slowly lightening… There’s a murder, maybe two, interminable scenes in a dockside bar, a reptilian British detective grinding out sentences with interminable gaps (the voice is Edward Fox’s), Tilda Swinton doing woman on the edge – the angular mouth; and interminable accordian music.  Tarr lingers on details at the end of scenes until it becomes annoying – and then a little while longer.  In one scene, a man brings a huge fish from the cold store of a shop and begins to chop it up.  You think – that’s 48 slices, surely no more?  But yes, there’s always more…

Fabulous film, actually, must now get the other two available.

Blackpaint

01.03.11

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: