Posts Tagged ‘Avatar’

Blackpaint 25

December 31, 2009

Gauguin

Yesterday, I was reading Hadley Freeman’s column in Guardian, in which she happened to bring up Gauguin in relation to the fim “Avatar”.  Unfortunately, I chucked the paper away (in the recycle bin, of course) and since then it’s found its way to the bin outside – and I’m not going sorting through that.

I was under the impression that she had written something like this, referring to the portrayal of the native population of the planet under attack: “Add in a couple of orange brush strokes and you will have something like a Gauguin and just as patronising, simplistic and offensive”.  I thought this was good, a controversial viewpoint to blog about – especially since today’s Guardian has a reference to a forthcoming Gauguin show at Tate Modern with the following words: “His art, however, is a time bomb, still ticking in the 21st century”.  This sounds pretty positive to me; not the sort of thing you’d write about someone patronising, simplistic, etc.

However, I checked her article online before writing, and it seems to have changed.  It now reads, “Add in a couple of orange brush strokes and you have a Gauguin painting.  It (the portrayal) is patronising, simplistic and offensive, like Palin and fake science.”  I suppose this still implies that Gauguin’s paintings are P, S and O, but the attack is  diverted through the easier targets of Palin and fake science.

Well, I could be totally wrong; on the other hand, at the bottom of the online article, it says “as amended on 30/12/09”.  If anyone cares enough to clear this up for me, I’d be grateful – tonight would be good, as I have not been invited to see the New Year in with anyone.  I wonder why.

For the record, I was wondering if you can patronise people who don’t exist (the people in the film, not the Tahitians Gauguin painted).  I suppose one is patronising the people who these fictional people resemble – or you think they resemble.  That could be dangerous in itself; who is to say that they see it, or themselves,  as you do?  This can be a recurring  problem for liberals and left wingers and all those who regularly feel and express indignation on behalf of others.

Since I can write what I like and no-one is reading anyway, I’m now going to do a U turn; I think it is P and S, but I think that Cameron was doing that PM thing of referencing other films (see last blog) and so, not particularly O.  But my son Tom violently disagrees and is doing a chemistry degree, so I suppose he must be right.

Postmodernism

I got “Art Theory for Beginners” for Christmas, one of those books which have cartoons and look really simple – until you read the accompanying text.  I’ve been reading about all those French philosophers, Derrida, Lyotard, Barthes, Baudrillard etc., in an attempt to give my own poor work some sort of spurious status by linking it to some “proper” movement or idea.  No success yet, but will continue to try.

Scandos

Another painting each from Jorn and Kirkeby, re my spurious thesis in last blog.

Jorn

Kirkeby

Watched Festen.  I think the ending was sentimental.  The family should have backed the father up to the bitter end.

Listened to “Cold, Cold Feeling”, by T Bone Walker (in “When did you last see your father?” by Blake Morrison – he must have had the same EP as me in the early 60s).

“I got a cold, cold feeling, it’s just like ice around my heart, (*2)

I know I’m gonna quit somebody, every time that feelin’ starts.”

Blackpaint

31.12.09

Happy New Year.

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Blackpaint 24

December 26, 2009

Jorn, Kirkeby, Updahl & Co

I’ve been thinking about the Balka entry of a few days back and whether the argument could  be extended to other nationalities; are do we (or  critics)  expect Scandinavians to do dark skies, mountains and snow, or else  creatures that  are a hybrid of Norse mythology and their own imaginations?  Obviously, there must be loads of artists who don’t fit these stereotypes, but they may act as a sort of filter through which foreign – and maybe Scandinavian critics view their work and therefore help to nurture, if not create,  the stereotypes.

Per Kirkeby

Asger Jorn, Trauer

Two examples above, that are fairly representative of the artists’ work at given stages of their careers; two more tomorrow that will undermine the premise.

Watching: Avatar- Apocalypse Now, Lord of the Rings, Soldier Blue, The Jungle Book, Alien – did I miss any other obvious references?

Blackpaint

26.12.09