Posts Tagged ‘Karla Black’

Blackpaint 347 – Bowling, Nicholson, Chelsea and Quinn

June 21, 2012

Tate Britain

Some “new” stuff, worth a look:

Howard Hodgkin, deep resonant green and white, more clear-cut than his usual brushwork.

Catherine Yass video, replacing the Wallinger’s airport hall; this one, of a tightrope walker, startng the transit between two tower blocks in Glasgow, the Red Road site, I think.  He gets about halfway, and then retreats backwards, the winds being too strong.  Sweating palms and clenched sphincter job, for me anyway.  Not sure what the Yass output was; most of it was taken from tightrope walker’s helmet camera.  Wallinger’s was in slo-mo, with added music – don’t think there was music for this one and normal speed…

As part of the Patrick Keiller exhibit, that striking Gursky photograph of the winding black and white roadways, entitled “Bahrain” (very similar to Burtynsky‘s work at the Photographer’s Gallery, technically anyway).

Karla Black, a whole room’s worth of exhibit, huge,long, loose, crumply roll of – wallpaper? with flattened “plates” of pastel powder, each of different colour, poured and compacted along its length.

Next door, fleshy, beige-grey, snail-like coils on individual stands, by Sarah Lucas; a huge, emerald green Tillmans photograph, with the black inky threads trailing and swirling like hair under water; and a couple of Calum Innes works, one blue and yellow game of two halves, the other, black or dark, with Clyfford Still-like “tears” running down.

Elsewhere, a lovely geometric abstract with a rough, yellow/green surface by Winifred Nicholson, called “moonlight and Lamplight” from 1937.

The most striking thing for me there at the moment is the roomful of Frank Bowling’s poured acrylic paintings; blistering, bright colours, reminiscent of John Hoyland (indeed, several of Bowling’s paintings on net are very like Hoyland’s – or vice versa).

Chelsea Degree Show

Opposite the Tate, some seriously good work on show, and the catalogue only £2; there is a white room complex on the ground floor that is particularly good; square arches giving a series of partial views through.  Two big paintings in Popart style, one yellow with bathing suits hanging on a line, the other sort of lilac or mulberry pinky, motif like a frame, I think.  In next space, through an arch, patches of fabric stuck onto canvases in such a way that they overlap the walls.  Through another arch, a sort of campsite scenario set up, with a little camp stove with an orange paper(?) flame twisting and “burning”.  Individually, not so impressive maybe, but seen as a collective piece spreading over the several white spaces, very pleasing.

Also, a number of wall plaques, I suppose you could call them, composed of slatches of pigment of Bram Bogart thickness, with fragments of paper, card or fabric “splatted” onto them, as if stamped into the vivid and various paints with a rubber sole. 

La Strada

Watched this again, and found  Giuletta Masina’s Chaplinesque mugging very irritating.  The relentless comic pathos, determined brutishness of Anthony Quinn and the circus background disguise the harsh essentials of the story – sister dead, sold to a thug for 10.000 lire, beaten, raped (?), humiliated, the murder of the acrobat – it’s not a comedy.  Anthony Quinn is the anti- George Clooney.. or Cary Grant, to get the era right.  Interesting to see the influence of the film; that religious procession was in the Godfather II, surely, and maybe Le Quattro Volte.

Blackpaint

21.06.12

Blackpaint 256

March 1, 2011

British Art Show 7 (Hayward) continued – a bit

Olivia Plender – One of those things where a fictional person or story is fabricated and developed; this one is a film director.  Posters, interviews with “colleagues”, autobiographical details, filmography… clever but irritating.

Mick Peters – an architect’s table (cheated, and read the notes), supporting a couple – or maybe just one – of those huge, two man lumberjack saws, painted bright red and rendered “soft”, like Dali’s watches or Oldenberg’s stuff.

Karla Black – A squared-off-at the top pyramid of earth, Aztec rather that Egyptian, with bits and pieces of -coloured plastic (?)  littering the top.  something to do with the brain, I remember.

Drawings/paintings of pseudo-mechanical structures in bright red on off-white paper.  I liked these, but didn’t get name of artist.  If it’s you, please comment and let me know.

Becky Beasley – 6 (I think) enormous photos of the same two interlocking pieces of iron pyrites, taken from different angles.

Matthew Darbyshire – an open-plan room in pinks, with sofas, soft furnishings and lampshades.

Maaike Schoorel – What at first look like plain white paintings, prove to have very faint figures drawn on them with a brush.  Similar – ish idea to the Portuguese artist in the Tate Modern, who erases big tracts of his paintings; I can’t remember his name (rather appropriately, really).

That’s it – for my money, Cullinan Richards, Christian Marclay, Phoebe Unwin and Charles Avery are the most interesting.  I’d have liked to see the naked man on the burning bench, though.

The Man from London, Bela Tarr

Tarkovsky’s Solaris was once memorably described as “stately paced” in a Time Out review (maybe it was City Limits, come to think of it).  This description also fits Tarr’s film, based on a Simenon story.  Black and white, harbour, ferry, night time, rain, steam, trains, gantry, signal box, silent, brooding men, suitcases, fag smoke, spirits, glimmering lights, darkness slowly lightening… There’s a murder, maybe two, interminable scenes in a dockside bar, a reptilian British detective grinding out sentences with interminable gaps (the voice is Edward Fox’s), Tilda Swinton doing woman on the edge – the angular mouth; and interminable accordian music.  Tarr lingers on details at the end of scenes until it becomes annoying – and then a little while longer.  In one scene, a man brings a huge fish from the cold store of a shop and begins to chop it up.  You think – that’s 48 slices, surely no more?  But yes, there’s always more…

Fabulous film, actually, must now get the other two available.

Blackpaint

01.03.11