Posts Tagged ‘Zhanna Kadyrova’

Blackpaint 657 – Cow on Wheels, Slamming Gate, Flat Brick Skirts

November 8, 2019

Venice Biennale continued

Seems like weeks ago now – but here is the remainder of my pick:

 

Italian Pavilion

This is in the firm of a labyrinth with melted human remains at various points, as well as an artificial beach set up with deck chairs and umbrellas – and the above.

 

Peruvian Pavilion

Several billboard-size paintings like the above; indigenous peoples displayed, ironically, I assume, in leisure/glamour poses.

 

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Uruguayan Pavilion

Great collection of little paintings and drawings, like the above.

 

Serbian Pavilion.

Contrasting paintings (colourful and snappy) and sculpture, in old Communist heroic style.

 

Belgian Pavilion.

A series of unsettling tableaux, making up a sort of asylum of demented characters like those in the picture.

 

Great Britain 

Works by Cathy Wilkes.

Assemblages and paintings, in bland, pastel shades like the above, which refer to domestic, “feminised” surroundings suggesting (to me) a sort of restricted, imprisoned existence – maybe that’s just the meaning I expect such pieces to carry.  The piece is a moulded pregnant female belly.

 

German Pavilion.

Large boulders distributed around a space divided by marked out lines on the floor, as in the picture.   Loud, whining, screaming noises.  According to the handbook, “architectural elements, sound, sculptures and installations create a space that makes the economic, political and social conflicts of the present day socially tangible…” and so on.  This is very typical of the handbook, which is strong on interpretation, but gives one very little idea of the actual nature of the exhibits.

The Greek pavilion provides another good example of this.  My diary entry reads: “GREECE – Liked this one; video of Christos and his mate making bean stew – courgettes, beans – toms? Why not?.. and some celery.  His mate preferred the chicken.  Also, thousands of upside-down jam (?) pots, crammed together on the floor, so you could walk on them.”  The handbook says:”Sounds, moving images and architectural elements dub the pavilion building with new layers of meaning: translucent and open, the past and the future coexist in a condition of active present, where the ardour of the instantaneous allows for interpretations of the past to configure in an associative and instinctive manner.”

 

 

Czech Republic.  Stanislav Kolibal

Liked this one.  Terrific geometric drawings and sculptures, some with string, some with melted ends.

 

Nordic Countries Pavilion.

Artificial tree trunks, more boulders (see Germany) and hanging sheets of vari-coloured latex “seaweed”.  It’s all to do with environment, climate change and mass extinction, obviously, I guess.

From here on, displays by single artists in the Central Pavilion of the Giardini:

 

Soham Gupta, Kolkata

 

Zhanna Kadyrova, Ukraine

 

Henry Taylor, LA

 

 

Ulrike Muller, Austrian, works in LA

 

 

Njideka Akunyili Crosby – Born Nigeria, lives and works in LA

These collages, together with the paintings of Michael Armitage (below) were my favourites in this section.

 

Nabuqi, Beijing

Cow on wheels, on track – what could be more profound?

 

This could, I suppose…Shilpa Gupta, Mumbai,

Gate slams periodically into white wall, slowly demolishing, or at least, damaging it.  Shades of Kapoor…

 

 

 

 

Three works by Michael Armitage, born in Kenya, lives and works in London and Nairobi.

Big, sometimes crudely coloured and drawn African paintings, suggestive of hand-painted posters; some with pink undercoat shining through, like Poussin (or Harold Gilman).

OK, enough with the Biennale-

 

Had to include this photograph I took last week, of the house opposite, which is having a loft installed.  Two apparently cloaked figures stand motionless behind the polythene sheets, while a yellow-clad guitarist plays his instrument at the front of the building…

 

Across the Great Divide

Blackpaint

8.11.19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blackpaint 656 – Whitechapel, Venice and Houellebecq

October 23, 2019

Anna Maria Maiolino, Making Love Revolutionary, at Whitechapel Gallery until 12th January 2020

This exhibition contains many wonderful things, as does the current Venice Biennale; what readers may have realised over the years is that I’m not good at, or interested in, discovering or even having a stab at the meaning of a work of art.  It’s enough if the work pleases or interests me in itself, without explanations in reams of artspeak in catalogues or on a gallery wall.  Looking back, it seems I don’t do much more than put forward some possible similarities to other artists or works – and some of those links are pretty spurious.

And today’s blog is no different – so here are some examples of Maiolino’s work, with not much in the way of comment:

Clay, I believe , on a table.  The legs are not part of the artwork – although they improve the photo.

 

Her drawings on paper are very fine, clean and clear.

 

 

Magnets and iron filings come to mind (mine, anyway).  And black holes…

 

The spaceman has fish on a plate – and is that an otter… or beaver?

 

Several of Maiolino’s works are of this sort; paper or stiff card, cut and contained within a box-like frame, tight as a drum and sharply geometric.  Some have cords or rather threads attached in various ways.

 

Glistening piles – maybe a single joined-up tube of vari-coloured…matter, again on a table top, making a nice contrasting “book end” to the first illustration.  Anish Kapoor had several exhibits similar to this at Guggenheim Bilbao some nine years ago.  A liberating piece of work.

 

 

Venice Biennale: “May You Live in Interesting Times”

As with the last Biennale, diversity, migration, refugees are major concerns in the selection – although you wouldn’t know it from looking at many of the artworks.  The handbook is an essential guide to what somebody thinks the pieces represent, but you won’t be able to divine from it what the works actually consist of.  More of this, with examples, next blog.  Here are some of the individual contributions:

 

Tavares Strachan

This US artist is concerned with the African American contribution to the space programme; this piece is about a black astronaut who was killed in an accident, whilst training others.

 

Gabriel Rico

Coke (Pepsi?) bottle, carrot et al with light tubes.  Early Martial Raysse?

 

Yin Xiuzhen, “Trojan”

The giant figure is slumped forwards in the seat; coverings made from stretched shirts, jackets etc.

 

Martine Gutierrez

She does giant photos of herself in provocative positions with male mannequins.  Here she is, gazing – longingly? fearfully? – up from the pool at the suited and booted figure… a Houellebecq scenario, possibly (see below).

 

Cameron Jamie

These heads on sticks are inspired by the Austrian (?) Krampus legends.

 

Alexandra Bircken

Black vinyl “skins” hanging from the rafters – an obvious “Strange Fruit” reference…

 

Andra Ursuta

These “ice” sculptures are actually made from treated wax – very effective.

 

Danh Vo

Paint slapped and smeared and left to run down polished metal mirror – love this.

 

Zhanna Kadyrova

This is just a corner of a whole vegetable and meat market made from a variety of materials, from cardboard to cement.  Reminded me of Fischli and Weiss, who used to do these sort of realist assemblages made out of polystyrene mostly…

 

 

 

Michel Houellebecq, Serotonin

Just finished Houellebecq’s latest and I’m still struggling to understand why the Marxist intellectuals who make up my book group like him so much.  He’s arguably pretty, well VERY right wing (it’s not all irony, is it?), hates feminism, has absolutely nothing good to say about socialism, hates the EU, writes enthusiastically about the international sex industry, etc. etc.   He IS French however, so I suppose he appeals to the automatic anti-British leanings of many leftie intellectuals, as identified by Orwell years ago.  In Serotonin, he comes quite close to some romantic, even lyrical passages – so he offsets these with a sequence in which a German paedophile molests a young girl, apparently with her consent and for money.  That should be shocking enough, he maybe thinks, to prevent his becoming a National Treasure in France…  I wouldn’t bank on it; maybe he already is.

Two of my pictures to finish, as usual:

 

Soho Newsagent’s Window 1963 (1 and 2)

Blackpaint

October 2019